The Siege of Boston: The Revolutionary War in Four Minutes



245 years ago on March 17, 1776, British Commander William Howe officially withdrew his troops from Boston, Massachusetts, effectively ending the eleven month siege by George Washington’s Continental Army. https://www.battlefields.org/learn/revolutionary-war

Historian Jim Percoco explains the arduous task that faced the Continental Army as they attempted to force the British out of Boston from 1775 through 1776. From Henry Knox’s daring wintertime journey to Fort Ticonderoga and back to fetch artillery, to Washington’s struggle to effectively organize the Continental Army for the first time.

This is a rebranded version of one of our existing Revolutionary War In4 videos.
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17 thoughts on “The Siege of Boston: The Revolutionary War in Four Minutes

  1. American Battlefield Trust says:

    245 years ago today on March 17, 1776, British Commander William Howe officially withdrew his troops from Boston, Massachusetts, effectively ending the eleven month siege by George Washington's Continental Army. We hope you enjoy our newest rebranded Revolutionary War In4!

  2. Kilter Kaos says:

    I read somewhere where I believe it was the brother or cousin of Israel Putman who was one of Washington’s general/officer recommended building chandeliers out of wood. And then moving them into place during the dark of night. Luckily it was a moonlit night and then in the morning the fog had settled into Boston, allowing Washington to move the chandeliers into place without being seen.

  3. Richard Evans says:

    Not entirely true. The British tried to disloge washingtom from Dorchester Heights overlooking Boston and the harbor. There were either 2 or 3 charges up Dorchester Heights (what is now South Boston). All were unsuccesful. That's when the British commander left Boston by sea.

  4. Kyle Dunn says:

    My fellow New Englanders, we must rise to meet these many Torrey Kings and Queens to regain our independence and our God given rights set to ink at Independence Hall in Philadelphia in July of 1776. We must have our voices heard long, loud, and all across America.

  5. Stephen Wells says:

    As I've heard this story the cannons were a bluff. Cannons they had ammunition they didn't.

  6. Laughing dog says:

    We need Americans like that today to deal with the traitors that inhabit/infect the capital today. Even Benedict Arnold was better than the people in the capital today.

  7. FiringallCylinders says:

    I'm going through Michael Troy's American Revolution podcast right now. I'm learning so much. Howe just took Philadelphia and Washington settled at Valley Forge for winter quarters.

  8. arevavaful says:

    Your channel is teaching me so much about our Country's Beginnings.
    Thank you! I'm discovering how brave and determined our men were.

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