Fight for Egypt – WW2 Battle Scenes | Combat Footage | British vs Axis Forces in Africa | 1943



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This newsreel shows the fierce fight for Egypt during the WWII.

About the North African Campaign
During the Second World War, the North African Campaign took place in North Africa from 10 June 1940 to 13 May 1943. It included campaigns fought in the Libyan and Egyptian deserts (Western Desert Campaign, also known as the Desert War) and in Morocco and Algeria (Operation Torch) and Tunisia (Tunisia Campaign).

The campaign was fought between the Allies and Axis powers, many of whom had colonial interests in Africa dating from the late 19th century. The Allied war effort was dominated by the British Commonwealth and exiles from German-occupied Europe. The United States entered the war in 1941 and began direct military assistance in North Africa on 11 May 1942.

Fighting in North Africa started with the Italian declaration of war on 10 June 1940. On 14 June, theBritish Army’s 11th Hussars (assisted by elements of the 1st Royal Tank Regiment, 1st RTR) crossed the border from Egypt into Libya and captured the Italian Fort Capuzzo. This was followed by an Italian counteroffensive into Egypt and the capture of Sidi Barrani in September 1940 and then in December 1940 by a Commonwealth counteroffensive, Operation Compass. During Operation Compass, the Italian10th Army was destroyed and the German Afrika Korps—commanded by Erwin Rommel—was dispatched to North Africa—during Operation Sonnenblume—to reinforce Italian forces in order to prevent a complete Axis defeat.

A see-saw series of battles for control of Libya and parts of Egypt followed, reaching a climax in the Second Battle of El Alamein when British Commonwealth forces under the command of Lieutenant-General Bernard Montgomery delivered a decisive defeat to the Axis forces and pushed them back to Tunisia. After the late 1942 Allied Operation Torch landings in North-West Africa, and subsequent battles against Vichy France forces (who then changed sides), the Allies finally encircled Axis forces in northern Tunisia and forced their surrender.

Operation Torch in November 1942 was a compromise operation that met the British objective of securing victory in North Africa while allowing American armed forces the opportunity to engage in the fight against Nazi Germany on a limited scale. In addition, as Josef Stalin had long been demanding a second front be opened to engage the Wehrmacht and relieve pressure on the Soviet armies, it provided some degree of relief for the Eastern front by diverting Axis forces to the African theatre, tying them up and destroying them there.

Information gleaned via British Ultra code-breaking intelligence proved critical to Allied success in North Africa. Victory for the Allies in this campaign immediately led to the Italian Campaign, which culminated in the downfall of the fascist government in Italy and the elimination of a German ally.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_African_Campaign

About the Afrika Korps
The German Africa Corps (German: Deutsches Afrikakorps, DAK), or just the Afrika Korps, was the German expeditionary force in Libya and Tunisia during the North African Campaign of World War II. The reputation of the Afrika Korps is synonymous with that of its first commander Erwin Rommel, who later commanded the Panzer Army Africa which evolved into the German-Italian Panzer Army (Deutsch-Italienische Panzerarmee) and Army Group Africa, all of which Afrika Korps was a distinct and principal component. Throughout the North African campaign, the Afrika Korps fought against Allied forces until its surrender in May 1943.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Afrika_Korps

About Rommel:
Erwin Johannes Eugen Rommel (15 November 1891 — 14 October 1944), popularly known as The Desert Fox (Wüstenfuchs), was a German Field Marshal of World War II. He earned the respect of both his own troops and the enemies he fought.

In World War II, Rommel further distinguished himself as the commander of the 7th Panzer Division during the 1940 invasion of France. His leadership of German and Italian forces in the North African campaign established him as one of the most able commanders of the war, and earned him the appellation of the Desert Fox. He is regarded as one of the most skilled commanders of desert warfare in the conflict.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erwin_Rommel

Castle Films Fight for Egypt 1943
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18 thoughts on “Fight for Egypt – WW2 Battle Scenes | Combat Footage | British vs Axis Forces in Africa | 1943

  1. Виталий Буртоликов says:

    Several british armies against single german AfrikaKorps and italian colonial troops. Three years of great and heroic struggle😒 It's impressive for over than 70 years later. R. i. P. the soldiers, who killed for imperialist interests so far from their motherland.

  2. Diego Jose Bate says:

    Fantastic! Now I can add this to my learning list!!!

  3. Humane Human says:

    I had no idea this occurred.

  4. 5:44 that italian crew in the S.M.79 torpedo bomber had balls of STEEL!

  5. Great video, ruined by the crappy septic narrator.

  6. Martin 0691 says:

    Stunning footage

  7. Rommel sure did know what he was doing in Africa but then his luck literally flipped over

  8. christian demulling says:

    loved this clip and should be shown in class rooms. kids these days dont even know Germany had allies or what they invaded

  9. KELVINightHUNTER says:

    The pyramids are lucky,it didn't ruined by the war,maybe the dead pharaoh there was disturbed

  10. Thomas Hodge says:

    I could be wrong, but surely this shows Commonwealth forces, not just British. Maybe someone who knows the uniform/weaponry inside out can say one way or the other but North Africa also had lots of Aussies/Kiwis/Canadians.
    Anyway, interesting video.

  11. Tech Noir says:

    Great video, much admiration for the British service men.

  12. Francoberry says:

    great stuff! you really deserve more views!

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